Batch 141 – Czech Pilsner with Kazbek Hops (all-grain)

In anticipation of our vacation to Europe, which would take us to Munich, Pilsen Prague,  and Budapest in June and July 2017, I ordered ingredients from Home Brew Supply to make a Czech Pilsner.  I had decided I wanted to use Kazbek hops, which are described as having been bred from a crossing of Saaz hops and a wild variety of hops from the Caucasus mountains.  The other ingredients included:

  • 9.0 pounds of Weyermann Pilsner Malt
  • 8.0 ounces of Weyermann Light Munich Malt
  • 8.0 ounces of Weyermann Carafoam Malt
  • 2.0 ounces of Dingemans Aromatic Malt
  • 4.0 ounces Kazbek Hops
  • 2 packs White Labs WLP800 Pilsner Lager Yeast
Batch 141 - Czech Kazbek Pilsner

Ingredients for the Czech Kazbek Pilsner

I really liked Homebrew Supply – I ordered from them for this batch and for the Dortmunder I had made a few weeks earlier.  It is unfortunate that since both of those orders, whenever I have checked out their site prior to ordering ingredients there is much that they no longer carry or are out of stock.  For example, on the grain bill for this batch, the only grain they have in stock as I am writing this (mid February 2018) is the Aromatic malt – but it doesn’t appear to be Dingemans Aromatic malt.

The predicted specs for this beer (using BrewPal) were as follows:

  • Original Gravity:  1.053
  • Final Gravity:  1.013
  • 5.2% ABV
  • 4.2ºL
  • 38 IBU

Brew day was in the beginning of May 2017.  It went pretty smoothly and I came pretty close to hitting the target original gravity…

Original Gravity Reading - Batch 141

Hitting the target original gravity

…but after two weeks in primary, the beer seemed stuck at 1.026 and was not near the final gravity of 1.013.

Some progress after two weeks

1.026 two weeks into primary fermentation

I left it in primary for three more weeks, and it seemed to finish up a little better than my target final gravity.

1.010 Final Gravity

1.010 final gravity when transferring to secondary/lagering

I was really pleased with how it finished.  It was definitely much lighter in color than any other beer I have made.  I transferred the beer to secondary fermentation a few weeks before we left for vacation, figuring that when we got back in mid-July, it would be a good time to keg the beer.

It turned out that filtering and kegging didn’t take place for a couple more months .  It was early September before I packaged the beer in a brand new keg I had purchased from Adventures in Homebrewing for $69.99 at the end of July.

By the beginning of September the beer had not budged from the previous final gravity.

Final Gravity at kegging

Final gravity measurement (1.010) at kegging

As I mentioned, was extremely light in color and had settled very clear – almost to the point where I almost decided to not filter it.

Czech Kazbek Pilsner sampe

Light color and beautiful clarity!

The first draft was pulled on Labor Day weekend of 2017, and the keg hung around until just after Christmas.

Czech Kazbek Pilsner

First draft of the Czech Kazbek Pilsner

It turned out great, and I’m looking forward to maybe brewing it again this spring.


This entry was posted in All-grain Brewing, Czech Pilsner, Czech Pilsner, Homebrewing, Light Beer is for Lightweights and Women. Bookmark the permalink.

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